Panels in Libraries (Connecting to our Hotline)

After passing the circulation desk on the main floor of the Mt. Pleasant Library, the satellite exhibit for “A Right to the City” is a prominent feature that demands attention. With its interlocking panels and dynamic visuals, visitors are beckoned to take a closer look at the new structure.

A closer examination reveals the subject of the structure – the neighborhood. For residents, perhaps it speaks about the events that they have witnessed and perhaps they learn about how their neighborhood came into its current state.

For those reminiscing and for those with curiosity, the participatory panel stands out. The dedicated hotline allows for participation for residents who look at the exhibit and think “I remember when…”. It also allows for the curious to explore their neighborhood through the eyes of those who helped shape it.

Library Event: Panel Dialogue at the Woodridge Neighborhood Library

The Woodridge Neighborhood Library sign.

Around DC, a series of events at neighborhood libraries are beginning in collaboration with the exhibit “A Right to the City” at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum.

Dr. Samir Meghelli (Left) and Dr. Joy Kinard (right) discussing the pushback for building the North Central Freeway.
Continue reading Library Event: Panel Dialogue at the Woodridge Neighborhood Library

Library Event: Coffee and Conversation at the Parklands-Turner Library

Paul Perry (second from left, from the Smithsonian) and Auset Whaley (at center, from the DC Public Library) with two Advisory Neighborhood Commissioners (on ends) and a teen volunteer. Credit: Lawrence Clinkscale

Around DC, a series of events at neighborhood libraries are beginning in collaboration with the exhibit “A Right to the City” at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum.

One of the first took place this past Saturday (Feb. 16, 2019) at the Parklands-Turner Neighborhood Library. Their “coffee and conversation” event presented the project and several opportunities for involvement. Overall, the residents in attendance expressed great interest in seeing more community programs of this nature and are eager to visit the Humanities Truck, either at their local libraries or at local festivals. Residents are also looking forward to contributing their stories and memorabilia for what may evolve into a Congress Heights oral history project.

There will be more public events in the near future to share stories from the exhibit — and to gather more from the public. Stay tuned!

Thanks to Auset Whaley for most of this information, which was posted by Hazel Arroyo of American University.

Planning the DC Public Library Events

Gathering at Washingtoniana / Special Collections of DCPL

We introduced our truck and system to library leaders this week, as part of planning the next nine months of DC activities and the satellite exhibits for A Right to the City. Our location was fitting: the Washintoniana Collection (Feb. 14, 2019), which was a key source for the exhibit, and is part of the Special Collections for DC Public Library (DCPL).

Parking the Humanities Truck — we are still learning how!

As a teaser, we wanted to show what the AU Humanities Truck could do for DCPL outreach. We are adding more approved drivers, and exploring how to best position it for events.

A very early map draft of branch libraries hosting the satellite exhibits

Three main materials were prototyped in preparation for the event: a post card of a hand-drawn partial map of DC with the six participating library locations indicated, a post card to be used in a hypothetical scavenger hunt, and a phone line that corresponds with the scavenger hunt post card.